Classification of chemicals

Classification of chemicals

Classification of chemicals

Classification of chemicals: Dangerous goods are classified and labeled
in many countries according to the United Nations system.
In this system, hazardous goods are categorized according to their hazardous properties in six classes.
These classes include nine distinct classes and a different class of materials.
The risks for each class are marked with special rhomboidal labels.
Some hazardous goods, including classes 8, 4, 1, 2 and 9, have sub-classes.
Which indicates a certain aspect of the dangers of the substance.
In some classes, subsequent categorization includes packaging groups
, which indicates the relative risk of matter inside a class
(PG-III low risk, PG-II medium risk, high-risk PGI)
Therefore, all packages, containers, and tankers carrying hazardous goods should
be labeled appropriately with the appropriate class name.
This label shows the nature of the risk using a color system and special characters,
as well as a hazard class item.

Class 1 Explosive

class 1

Includes substances that can cause explosions or pyrotechnic effects.
Production of explosives is generally limited and is subject to the relevant regulations.
The use of explosives for research needs is subject to obtaining the necessary permissions from the responsible organizations.

Explosives include 6 sub-classes:

Class 1-1 Explosives with a sudden and fearful explosion
Example: TNT Nitroglycerin, Mercury Fulminate

Class 1-2 Explosives with Risk of Throw (but not the danger of a blast of fearsome)
Example: bombs, grenades

Class 1-3 Explosive materials with a high fire hazard
Example: gunpowder, fireworks

Class 1-4 Explosives without fearsome explosion
Example: Fireworks on Toys

Classes 1-5 Explosive explosives with low explosive sensitivity
Depower like Proprietary Example: Explosive

Class 1-6 Explosive materials with very low explosive sensitivity

Class 2 gases

class 2

The hazardous goods of this class include pressure gases, liquid gases or pressure gases.

Gases include 3 sub-classes:

Class 2-1 flammable gases

Class 2-2 Non-flammable and non-toxic gases

Class 2-3 toxic gases

Toxic gases are gases that inhale them to cause death or serious health damage to humans.

Example: chlorine and ammonia.

Class 3 flammable liquids
class 3

For liquids flammable, a mixture of liquids or liquids containing solids is soluble or suspended.

Which can ignite in contact with a source of ignition, such as gasoline, thinners, paints, varnishes and flammable solvents?

It should be noted that in the older segmentation of this class, two sub-scales were divided into two sub-classes: 0-2 and 0-1.

But the new classification for subclass flammable liquids has not been taken into
consideration, but for these materials, the packaging groups (PG I, II, III) have been
considered.

PGI grade 3 – Highly flammable liquid
With an initial boiling point less than 08 ° C

Example: Di-ethyl ether, carbon disulfide

Class PG-II -3 Flammable Liquids Extremely high
With an initial boiling point greater than 08 ° C and a flash point less than
10 ° C

Like: gasoline, acetone

Class PIROGI -3 flammable liquid with flash point 10 to 92 ° C

Example: Crown, Turpentine Mineral

This group was called “subclass 2-3” in the previous division

Class 4 flammable solids

class 4

Hazardous materials in this class include materials with spontaneous combustion
potential as well as materials that can cause flammable gases in contact with water.
Also, solids (other than explosives) that immediately burn or cause fire are also classified in this class.

This class contains 3 sub-classes:

Class 4-1 flammable liquid

Materials that are easily ignited and combustible.
Example: Nitrocellulose, phosphorus, matches, and Acid Pic

Class 4-2 cylinders with spontaneous combustion potential
Example: Charcoal, cotton and white phosphorus

Class 4 – Dangerous substances in the wet state
Includes solids that create flammable gases in contact with water.
Example: aluminum phosphide and calcium carbide

Class 5 oxidizing substances

class 5

The oxidizing agent contains 2 sub-classes:

Class 5-1 Oxidizing agents (other than organic peroxides)

Like hydrogen peroxide, calcium hypochlorite (used in pools), ammonium nitrate and nitrates

Class 5-2 Organic peroxides (solid or liquid)

Examples: Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide, Benzoyl Peroxide, Di benzoyl, and Per
Acetic Acid.
Oxidizing substances are not necessarily combustible by themselves but may cause other materials to ignite.
For example, sodium peroxide in the presence of water creates a strongly exothermic reaction,
and the need for mixing with charcoal also causes spontaneous combustion.
Organic peroxides have a structure with bivalent oxygen.

These materials are thermal insecure materials and therefore may spontaneously
decompose, which can sometimes cause explosive reactions or burn quickly,
or be sensitive to impact or friction, or produce dangerous reactions with other materials

Class 6 Toxic and Infectious Substances

class 6

 

This class includes two sub-classes of toxic substances and infectious substances,
but toxic gases, previously classified in class 3-2, are not included in this class.

Class 6-1: Toxic substances (including liquids and toxic solids)

Toxic substances include substances that cause death or serious injury
and serious harm to humans if swallowed, inhaled or through skin contact.

Example: Sodium Cyanide (NaCN) Cyanides and Arsenic Compounds.

Class 6-2 Infectious agents

Substances are substances that are known to be infectious or possibly
pathogenic (microorganisms include bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, parasites, and fungi).
Vaccines and pathological specimens are examples of this.
The maintenance instructions, how to work and how to dispose of infectious
substances should be in accordance with the health regulations and the
mode of transportation of this group of materials subject to the provisions
of environmental protection

Class 7 radioactive substances

This class contains materials or materials that constantly emit radioactive contaminants.
More precisely, the radioactive substance is a substance with a specific activity greater than 70 KB q / kg.
The activity is specific to activity in a unit mass of a radioactive substance.
There are no sub-classes for this class, but different packing groups are considered.
Example: Radioisotopes and uranium

Class 8 corrosives

class 8
Corrosive materials are solid or liquid substances that can damage the living tissues
and equipment during contact with chemical agents.

In other words, corrosive substances are substances that, by chemical action,
cause severe damage to living tissues, equipment, and other materials.

Examples: Hydrofluoric Acid, Sodium Hydroxide, and Clay Pools.

Class 9 Miscellaneous materials

class 9
This class shows the risk of miscellaneous materials that are not particularly severe
and are not classified in other classes.

Such as intense magnetic materials, aerosols, ammonium nitrate fertilizers,
and polyester granules.

Dangerous goods labels

This label represents various classes of hazardous goods and is used when
shipping these goods.

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